The student news site of Borah High School

The Borah Senator

Filed under Opinion

Do you like paper or plastic?

Tablets+v.+Textbooks
Tablets v. Textbooks

Tablets v. Textbooks

Monica Alder

Monica Alder

Tablets v. Textbooks

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Everyday, society is coming out with new technology to make life easier and better. Already, Borah’s upgraded itself with mobile computer labs, iPads in the library, QR scan codes for the yearbook, and apps to access grades 24/7. Now the question remains: Do we upgrade our textbooks to tablets?

Textbooks are large and heavy.
Carrying a textbook for each class
everyday can cause massive stress on the back, neck, and shoulders. Over time, this can create serious muscle strain and irritation to the spine and
ribcage, according to spine-health.com

Tablets are small, easy, and compact. A single tablet has the ability to collect thousands of different textbooks at any time. Instead of having to carry around seven textbooks throughout the day, they can all be kept on one tiny, lightweight device.

But is it a switch that should be made now by Borah administration?

According to tablets-textbooks.procon.org, a digital textbook can cost up to 60 percent less than a physical
textbook. However, the costs to implement tablets into the school system is 552 percent higher than buying brand new
textbooks. The tablet alone costs
anywhere from $200 to $300; a single class set would cost up to $9,000.

This is not including the costs in training staff members to use the new technology, and annual publishing fees to continue using the textbooks.

Tablets also provide easy access to things such as Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat, as well as an entire
multitude of games. Students could very easily get distracted by all the extra
gagets and applications a tablet has, and skip out on doing homework.

Traditional textbooks won’t distract a student. They’re cheaper in the long run and they won’t break down, get malware and virus errors, or lose their charge
before the school day’s over. They’re also a lot less likely to be stolen, due to their unpopular appeal.

The only downside to textbooks is the back pain. But tablets are not the healthier trade-off either, as over
usage can cause eye strain, blurred
vision, and headaches,   according to
healthguidance.org.

The switch from tablets to
textbooks in such a fast-moving society is
inevitable. But as of right now, there are too many problems and drawbacks
presented with tablets to make that switch. In the end,  the large, heavy textbook is the way to go.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Do  you like paper or plastic?

    Top Stories

    Storage locker provides food, supplies for campus

  • Do  you like paper or plastic?

    Top Stories

    Seasoned competitors, new faces dominate Economic Summit

  • Do  you like paper or plastic?

    Featured A&E

    Places to travel for summer

  • Do  you like paper or plastic?

    Top Stories

    Horticulture teacher and students prepare for annual plant sale

  • Do  you like paper or plastic?

    Top Stories

    Newspaper students receive awards, cash prizes from state journalism association

  • Do  you like paper or plastic?

    Top Stories

    Students visit Costa Rica over spring break

  • Do  you like paper or plastic?

    Top Stories

    Senior creates non-partisan organization to unite students through politics

  • Do  you like paper or plastic?

    Top Stories

    Poet Laureate, Juan Felipe Herrera, connects with high school students by sharing poems

  • Do  you like paper or plastic?

    Opinion

    Peer mentoring a better option than teacher’s aide

  • Do  you like paper or plastic?

    Top Stories

    An immigrant’s journey: difficult, tragic, dangerous

The student news site of Borah High School
Do you like paper or plastic?