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Are derogatory comments a problem?

Borah+is+known+for+the+diversity...+in+language.
Borah is known for the diversity... in language.

Borah is known for the diversity... in language.

Gabriel Abilie

Gabriel Abilie

Borah is known for the diversity... in language.

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Blatantly checking each other out as well as saying things like “Do fries come with that shake?”  to girls in the hallways are common.

Some say such language is just a stupid thing kids say.However, it is also derogatory,  demeaning, hurtful, discouraging, sexist… well you get the point.

And you’re probably thinking, “Oh my god, another female complaining about being uncomfortable with words.”

There are high schoolers yelling slang for “breasts” and “butts” on school grounds, yet everyone seems to ignore the objectification of females implied by such words.

The popular response to a complaint about vulgar language seems to label the complainer as “lame” or “radical” for an  inability to share a laugh about  any sexist “jokes.”

Those making sexist remarks always tell us to stop being offended, but rarely consider that they are the ones using offensive slang.

It has been suggested a campaign against the sexualization of our bodies be coordinated, but will that really stop the insensitivity?

When an issue like this happens, it is supposed to be reported so it can be acknowledged by the staff so disciplinary action can be taken.

Will reporting the incidents really stop the issue?

The fact of the matter is: sexism is a learned behavior. Reversing it will be a challenge.

The idea that females exist primarily to serve the male gaze is so ingrained into our social norms. Sexism isn’t always a conscious choice.

Not all men engage in objectification, and even females are part of the problem. Females call each other “sluts” just as much as men call them “whores,” but we cannot condone the encouragement of the “boys will be boys” mentality.

Everyone has a choice to be kind. Everyone knows the difference between a compliment and a slur.  Words can empower or sabotage.

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The student news site of Borah High School
Are derogatory comments a problem?